Pornographic, Offensive, or Just a Naked Body?

393px-Torii_Kotondo_-_Woman_Before_a_Mirror_-_Walters_95890

Last week, when I posted this article on Facebook, a┬ácouple of my guy friends expressed their discomfort with the art work I used. Several of my girlfriends defended the image. There was a debate about whether Facebook’s terms of service explicitly forbade all nudity or just pornography and whether this piece of art crossed the line into being pornography. You can read all the comments here.

As I pondered how to respond, I scrolled around clicking “like” on my friends’ clever witticisms and taking personality quizzes (I’m Bjork, according to Buzzfeed). And then I stumbled across a photo of a man I’ve never met naked in a bathtub eating a burrito.

Now… let’s talk about what’s pornographic and what’s offensive. The idea of pornography is that it’s intended to be used as masturbatory material. That is the supposed difference between porn and art. Of course, it’s also possible that a piece of fine art could arouse the viewer, and maybe the artist even created it with that intention. In those cases, the quality of the work is often what determines the difference. If the artist is good enough, the sexy painting ends up in a museum. If not, it goes in a closet.

For something to be offensive, on the other hand, is more serious. I’m not offended by things I simply disagree with, though. I am offended by sexism, racism, homophobia, and other forms of hate. Hate is the only thing I find truly offensive. Everything else is usually a matter of taste.

If you label something offensive just because you don’t agree with it, what you’re engaging in is not morality, it’s censorship. You are not “protecting the children” by shielding their eyes from a perfectly healthy image of a woman looking at her body in a mirror. Our society largely invalidates brilliant art work because we’re uncomfortable with the fact that it turns us on, or might turn someone on, or maybe just reminds us a little too much of sex.

To be clear, the picture I posted was of a woman looking at her vulva with a mirror. As my friend Krista said, “our necks don’t bend enough to see all the good stuff.” The woman is learning about her body and admiring it. She is smiling into the mirror. She loves herself. I don’t find anything offensive about that idea or the picture, and in fact the whole damn thing makes me happy.

As for the guy in the bath tub photo, that I didn’t want to see. I’ll admit I’ve posted a dorky selfie or two, but what the hell man? Actually, the photo was taken and posted by bathtub guy’s friend (who is my friend, hence me seeing the photo). I can’t quite imagine the circumstances that lead to this photo being taken, but I’m sure it was hilarious for the two of them. However, if any of my friends posted something that unflattering of me on the internet, we wouldn’t be friends anymore. But I’m still not offended by the photo. Furthermore, I doubt anyone will complain to my friend about the picture because we know him and his weird sense of humor. Everyone will roll their eyes and laugh about it. Facebook will not take down the post. It’s just a naked guy in a bathtub eating a burrito.

What’s wrong with that?

The Initiation and the Work
Content Update: Good Girls, Bad Girls and Intimate Self Reflection

4 thoughts on “Pornographic, Offensive, or Just a Naked Body?

  1. I love this. I love that it made me think about why we censor ourselves. I’m a big believer in putting others first, but also of being unashamed of who you are. When those things conflict, things get interesting.

    1. Thanks, Mandie! I really do try to be respectful of others when I pos something that might generate conflict, but I think free expression of ideas is the only way to have a productive conversation. That’s also why I really value my friends’ ability to express themselves intelligently and respectfully in the FB conversation. :-)

  2. So the issue for me is not the art as much as what my boss thinks of the art if he walks by when I’m taking a quick facebook break.

    1. Tom, yeah and I had that problem at my old job, so I do get it. I’m being a little idealistic here, but if your boss is so liberal that they don’t mind employees using social media during work hours (because we all know how distracting it is to begin with), then I would hope the same boss could be trusted to know the difference between an artistic nude on Facebook and a porn site.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *